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Kneller’s Happy Campers

Etgar Keret
The title novella can be read as a clever parody, full of humor and comic flashes. But it is also wistful, longing for a better world and perfect love. Etgar Keret is dreaming of a more perfect and beautiful world. This novella can be read as a clever parody, full of humor and comic flashes, yet also wistful, longing for a better world and perfect love. The hero, Hayim, commits suicide and goes to the place where all suicides end up. He soon finds a job in a pizzeria and makes friends. This posthumous world of the suicides is remarkably like ours: there are Jews and Arabs, junk food and Polish food like Mother's, but it is also possible to create small miracles there. For example, Hayim is "dying" to make a miracle and meet his girlfriend, Desirée, who committed suicide not long after he did. His search for Desirée takes him on a colorful, picaresque journey, full of gripping encounters. The climax is the longed-for meeting with Desirée and the Messiah, who promises to show his followers the way to a better world. Needless to say, the Messiah goofs and lets them down, and Hayim loses Desirée for the second time. An incurable optimist, he keeps longing and hoping.



Etgar Keret is the most brilliant, the wittiest, most frantic of young Israeli writers.
Literaturhaus Frankfurt

Etgar Keret is furiously contemporary. 
Le Nouvel Observateur

Etgar Keret, with his… back to the wall for almost three years of terror, provides us with everything at his disposal – his experience and ghosts – written in a deliberately indifferent style… He turns all this anti-emotional display into his flag, his style, in order to resist… Keret incarnates well the sort of mood that causes young people to crowd bars and pubs despite terrorism.
La Repubblica

Keret’s turbo-writing, which easily leaves young American and British authors behind, has led him into a surrealist wonderland. Except that his language remains as cool and ironic as the asphalt beat of here and now.
Der Spiegel


Keret Kneller`s Happy Campers
Title Kneller’s Happy Campers
Author’s Last Name Keret
Author's First Name Etgar
Language(s) Hebrew, English, German, French, Italian, Dutch, Arabic, Basque (Spain), Chinese, Corsican, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Galician (Spain), Greek, Hungarian, Korean, Malay (Malaysia), Malayalam (India), Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish, Turkish
Genre novella & stories
Publisher (Hebrew) Keter, Zmora-Bitan
Year of Publication (Hebrew) 1998
No. Pages 107 pp.
Book title - Hebrew (phonetic) Ha-Kaytana Shel Kneller
Representation Represented by ITHL

Translations

 
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